15 November 2007

tonight tonight

OlliePrayingMantisStyle

When I was a teenager, the sound of a skateboard slapping the pavement or just whooshing by was enough to give me whiplash. Yeah, I had a huge thing for skaters, but more so than that, I always ALWAYS wanted to learn how to skateboard myself. I would watch dudes on boards with a mixture of envy and admiration, simultaneously crushing on them and wanting to do the same things they did but even better. The reason I never learned how to skateboard, besides my father yelling at me that I was going to break my neck, is really because I have always been a wuss about hospitals and the thought of a broken arm or leg or worse (and trust me, I have seen worse happen to skaters - I have a friend who injured his spine, scary stuff there) is so thoroughly unappealing to me. The risk of injury on a skateboard is much greater than just walking, even if skating gets you there much quicker and is much more fun. Hence, I choose to walk. I'm boring that way.

Why all this talk about skateboards? One of the projects that I have been working on the last few days is this softie-skateboard for the latest Hit the Deck exhibition here in Boston. I have titled it "Ollie - Praying Mantis Style." I am pretty psyched to be a part of this show. There are a lot of great artists partaking in this event, and it sounds like the party is going to be hella cool! (Huhhuh, I said "hella.") I am listed on the flyer as "Softies" instead of "soto softies" - DOH! I gave them the correct info, but you know how the poo, it loves to happen. And apparently, asking for a blank skateboard at some of the local Cambridge skate shops is the equivalent to asking for guns or drugs or something else that would make the ATF's day, because let me tell you, they played "20 Questions" with me when I went looking for one. One place even told me that they didn't carry blank boards, when they had told Matt the week before that they did. At first I got a little up in arms about it because I thought I was being discriminated against for being female, but truthfully, the hardest time I got was from another woman, who basically interviewed me as if I were applying for a job just to buy a skateboard. For some reason, it reminded me a bit of the Comic Book Guy from the Simpsons and how he would interrogate people on their comic book knowledge in order to determine whether or not to sell them comic books. Comic books, skateboards - am I worthy of this subculture? Whatevs, I got my board, and this is what I did with it. There was a good deal of deliberation at first. I was debating whether or not to just paint something graphic on it, like do some cartoons of my softies with text, like one of the woodchucks with the fingerguns and, "Bang! Bang! King Kong ain't got nothin' on me!" But then I figured I was asked to participate in this because they had seen my work at the South End Open Studios in September, so they must know I make softies - why not incorporate the softie and the skateboard? Then I figured why not turn the softie into the skateboard, or rather, the skateboard into a softie. I hope it is well-received tonight.

6 comments:

maryse said...

good luck! i love what you did with the board.

Melissa said...

i love it! you are so creative :)

I share your love of the skateboard kind. Binoculars came into play more than once growing up! I tried skating for a little while, but yeah, that whole broken bone thing in the back of my head kinda made it tough to actually learn. the key is to learn young when you have no fear and are too stupid to know any better!

ingrid said...

That is really friggin' cool.

sulu-design said...

Awesome. Your interpretation is going to blow the others out of the water. Nice job. Hella nice job.

Greeley said...

How did the show turn out?

Alex said...

How did the show turn out? was Ollie well-received?